This article is part of Ophthalmology Advisor’s conference coverage from the 2021 meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, held in New Orleans from November 12 to 15, 2021. The team at Ophthalmology Advisor will be reporting on a variety of the research presented by the ophthalmology experts at the AAO. Check back for more from the AAO 2021 Meeting.

 

Children’s age did not impact the positive predictive value of vision screening when detecting amblyopia risk factors (ARF), with findings similar in children younger than 3 years old, and those between 3 and 5 years old, according to presenters at the  American Academy of Ophthalmology 2021 annual meeting in New Orleans, held November 12-15.


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According to the investigators, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends vision screening for amblyopia risk factors in 3- to 5-year-old children, but not in children younger because of insufficient evidence supporting its efficacy. In the review, researchers compared the positive predictive value of vision screening to detect ARF in children younger than 3 years and between 3 and 5 years, looking at 3114 individuals who had undergone a comprehensive eye examination after failing a vision screening (FVS). They used the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus’ 2003 criteria for ARF to determine the positive predictive value of FVS, collecting demographics and eye exam data. They also employed Pearson and logistic regression analyses to find any associations between positive predictive value of FVS and demographics.

They found that the positive predictive value of FVS was 60.5% for children younger than age 3, and 59.5% for those between 3 and 5 years old. “The difference in [positive predictive value] for children <3 and 3-5 years old was not statistically significant (Δ = 1%, 95% CI, -2.5% to 4.4%),” researchers reported. “Similarly, the odds ratio between [positive predictive value] was not statistically significant (P =.57), even after logistic regression (P =.79).”

“Evaluation of whether vision screening in young children improves vision and timely intervention is indicated,” the team concluded.

Visit Ophthalmology Advisor’s conference section for complete coverage of AAO 2021 meeting.

 

Reference

Zhou R, Pfister T, Donahue SP. Age does not influence the ppv of vision screening to detect amblyopia risk factors. Paper presented at: The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) 2021 Annual Meeting; November 12-15, 2021; New Orleans. Abstract PA018.