The following article is a part of conference coverage from the American Academy of Ophthalmology 2020, being held virtually from November 13 to 15, 2020. The team at Ophthalmology Advisor will be reporting on the latest news and research conducted by leading experts in ophthalmology. Check back for more from the AAO 2020.

Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is commonly applied to adult patients. But research presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s 2020 meeting shows that it can be a safe, effective, and stable method for correcting pediatric myopic anisometropia and that, when paired with prior occlusion therapy, it may even help reverse amblyopia.

The research evaluated 35 pediatric patients with a mean age of 7.4 years who received unilateral LASIK for myopic anisometropia (>6.00 D) after undergoing 6 months of occlusion/penalization therapy, spectacle correction, and 10 years of follow-up. The study then reviewed any changes in visual acuity, refraction, stereopsis, alignment, corneal clarity, and corneal topography. 


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The patients presented with a mean preoperative spherical equivalent of -10 D in the affected eye, with a difference of approximately 9 D between eyes. After undergoing the LASIK procedure, their mean spherical equivalent was -1.2 D plus or minus 0.9 D (P <.001). Anisometropic difference had significantly decreased as well, to approximately 1.4 D (P <.001). The patients also experienced improvement to their acuity from 0.1 plus or minus 0.1 before LASIK to 0.5 plus or minus 0.2 after LASIK combined with prior occlusion therapy (P <.001). 

The participants also all maintained clear corneas, stable corrected distance visual acuity, improved stereopsis, orthophoria, and stable refractions. Examinations using corneal topography showed no evidence of ectasia in the 10 years of follow-up.

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Reference

Sheha H. Ten-year outcomes of lasik in pediatric myopic anisometropia. Presented at: American Academy of Ophthalmology 2020 Annual Meeting; November 13-15, 2020. Abstract PO362.